“George doesn’t have to be curious all the time. Maybe sometimes he’s Angry George, or Ambitious George, or Sad, Confused, and Tired George.
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Curious George Henceforth Known as “George” to Discourage Kids from Labeling

By Samantha Wassel of Between the Monkey Bars

Everyone’s favorite childhood monkey is getting a new moniker.

PBS announced earlier this week that Curious George—the animated television star based off of H. A. Rey’s original book series—will be dropping his trademark adjective to be henceforth known simply as “George.”

“As much as we all love the original persona that H. A. Rey created for his beloved primate, we have to remain conscious of the times and continue evolving in order to create a safe, welcoming, diversified environment for our children,” stated PBS spokesperson Sue Noflache. “As a network, the last thing we want is to encourage kids to label others. Today’s youth shouldn’t grow up feeling pigeonholed. They need to know that we are the sum of our unique traits, talents, feelings, and experiences. No one should ever feel like they’re just ‘one thing.’”

Noflache made the announcement earlier this week, shortly after her 6-year-old daughter asked her—in her words—“an enlightening and compelling question.”

“She said, ‘Mama, why is George called ‘Curious George?’” stated Noflache. “And it got me thinking, why indeed? We don’t go around labeling people based off of their behavior in any given moment. I don’t call my mother-in-law ‘Passive Aggressive Susan’ or that bitch who never refills the coffee maker ‘Inconsiderate Amy.’

“Human emotions are not linear,” she continued. “George doesn’t have to be curious all the time. Maybe sometimes he’s Angry George, or Ambitious George, or Sad, Confused, and Tired George. Maybe today he’s Progressive George. The bottom line is, we want kids to understand that it’s normal for our feelings and behaviors to ebb and flow with our experiences and surroundings.”

Noflache said the change will be made official in the next few weeks and hopes the public receives it with a positive attitude.

“We just want George’s world to be a safe space,” she said.

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About the Author

Samantha Wassel is a sarcastic and slightly unhinged SAHM to three energetic boys and four lazy cats. She enjoys running, writing, kettle-belling, reading, nerding out, and eating exorbitant amounts of goat cheese and peanut butter (but not together, because barf). You can find more of her work at Between the Monkey Bars.